Entries tagged with conferences

“Other Logics of Writing”
Arkadii Trofimovich Dragomoshchenko at 70
Second International Conference ATD: Variations
24–25 November 2016
Saint Petersburg State University
Brobinsky Palace, Saint Petersburg

Premiya Arkadiya Dragomoshchenko
25–27 November 2016
Novaya Tsena Aleksandrinskovo Teatra
Saint Petersburg, Russia

Zina Dragomoshchenko
Evgeny Pavlov
Elena Dolgikh
Aleksandr Skidan
Selena Valyavkino
Nina Savchenkova
Anna Glazova
Aleksandr Ulanov
… More

Event 63: I Met (Tartu)

Association for the Study
of the Arts of the Present (ASAP)
University of Tartu, Estonia
2–6 September 2016

Johannes Göransson
Carla Harryman
Myka Tucker-Abramson
Joel Tyler Nickels
Joseph Jeon
Jonathan Eburne
Brian McHale
Jaak Tomberg
Märten Rattasepp
Agnes Neier
… More

          Bavarian-American Academy
          Summer Academy
          Florida International University
          Miami Beach, 5–11 June 2016

Martha Schoolman
Heike Paul
Meike Zwingenberger
Margarethe Schweiger-Wilhelm
John Landreville
… More

American Comparative
Literature Association

Harvard University
17–20 March 2016
(after On Kawara)

Johannes Göransson
Jonathan Stalling
Brian Reed
Anastasiya Lyubas
Liansu Meng
Anthony Abiragi
Anna Horakova
Hongjian Wang
Omaar Hena
Michal Wenderski
… More

The Louisville Conference
on Literature and Culture since 1900
University of Louisville
18–20 February 2016
(after On Kawara)

Alan Golding
Aaron Jaffe
Rodrigo Toscano
Lisa Gitelman
Mat Johnson
Johanna Drucker
Lauri Ramey
C.S. Giscombe
Aldon Nielsen
Tyrone Williams
… More

Event 55: Transvaluations I

Transvaluations of Value: Poetics and Political Economy
Session P28, 8:30–10:00 A.M., Friday, 20 November 2015
Modernist Studies Association

Herman Rapaport, “Transvaluations of Value: Fredric Jameson, Jackson Mac Low”
Barrett Watten, “The Poet/Critic: Transvaluations of Value After Modernism”
Tyrone Williams, “‘The Changing Same’: Value in Marx and Amiri Baraka”

This panel takes up debates between poetics and political economy after the recent turn to Marxist political economy as a materialist interpretive strategy for poetry and poetics. In a contrary move, a return to the aesthetic as a construction of value, sited in a more classical reading of modernist form by Charles Altieri, appropriates the concept of “value” for self-reflexive poetic forms. The three presenters will develop approaches to the concept of value that are irreducible either to economism, especially the commodity form, or to the aesthetic, e.g. modernism, and will seek to articulate more inclusive accounts of value that extend political economy to other value-producing registers in the horizons of art, history, ethics, and politics. [See next post.]

Modernist Studies Association
Boston, Massachusetts
19–22 November 2015
(after On Kawara)

Herman Rapaport
Tyrone Williams
Carla Billiterri
Ben Friedlander
Alisa Allkins
Alan Golding
Aaron Nyerges
Sarah Posman
Dorothy Wang
Rachel Galvin
Kaplan Harris
… More

Event 53: I Met (ASAP)

Association for the Study
of the Arts of the Present
Greenville, South Carolina
24–27 September 2015
(after On Kawara)

Jonathan Eburne
Nico Israel
Lytle Shaw
Sarah Brouillette
Mark Goble
Gloria Fisk
Brian McHale
Esther Gottlieb
Jennifer Ashton
Walter Benn Michaels
… More

Event 51: I Met (ACLA)

American Comparative Literature Association
Seattle, 26–29 March 2015
(after On Kawara)

renee hoogland
Anjuli Raza Kolb
Marjorie Levinson
Jonathan Stalling
Nick Admussen
Jinyi Chu
Jacob Edmond
Paul Manfredi
Florian Wagner
Yang Zi
… More

Event 47: MSA Pittsburgh

Modernist Studies Association
University of Pittsburgh
6–9 November 2014

“Modernism @ Stunde Null: Lee Miller, Hannah Höch, and A Woman in Berlin

This presentation is a part of a larger project on the intersection of literary and visual modernism with the “moment” of destruction that ended World War II: Stunde Null or Zero Hour. A range of modernist poets—Eliot, Pound, Williams, H.D., Breton, and later Olson, Plath, Duncan, and others—interrogated universal ethical and aesthetic values through this “moment.” In this presentation, I read the literary and visual testimony of three women caught up in the moment of destruction as witnesses, victims, or even perpetrators. Lee Miller’s war journalism, published in Vogue through the war, is complemented by the traumatic record and reparative work of her war and Holocaust photography. Hannah Höch, the dada painter and collagist, emerged from internal exile outside of Berlin to participate in the first modernist exhibitions in the destroyed city after Stunde Null; these early exhibitions set the stage for the recuperation of modernism after its banishment and humiliation under Nazism. Finally, the anonymously authored A Woman in Berlin, documenting the survival strategies necessary in a climate of mass sexual predation by Soviet troops immediately after the defeat, may be read in relation to search for or skepticism about universal values in modernism. In each case, writing or art not only add their testimony to history but posit and test new ways of being during and after the experience of trauma—they are prospective and retrospective.